Jenny Taylor

An established media professional, academic and writer, she trained with Yorkshire Post Newspapers and became the first race reporter in the Westminster Press Group, disconcertingly finding herself interviewing her heartthrob Cat Stevens, just after he became Yusuf Islam. She has travelled widely seeing the work of civil society organizations all over Asia and Africa at first hand. She is an expert on the connection between faith and culture, on which she has addressed parliamentary and Commonwealth gatherings. Her doctorate is from SOAS in London on Islam and secularization.

 


‘Students want old-fashioned dates back’ – US research

by Jenny Taylor - 7th March 2013

The TabletToo much sex – the sexualisation of society?’  Read Donna de Freitas and Jenny Taylor in The Tablet for the Westminster Faith Debate.

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The Christians who run a Delhi madrasa

by Jenny Taylor - 31st October 2012

As Islamophobia Awareness Month starts on Friday 2 November at the London Muslim Centre, here’s an example of Islamophilia, sent me by a Muslim friend, that might cheer things on a bit. 

Christians in Delhi are running a madrasa for girls in a slum district.

They’re not just any old Christians either.  They’re the inheritors of the extraordinary legacy of the Cambridge Brotherhood  (since renamed Delhi Brotherhood Society) who founded St Stephen’s Hospital and St Stephen’s School – alma mater of Rajiv Gandhi.

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Tom Holland's Islam film: the scholar versus the booby

by Jenny Taylor - 5th September 2012

Historian Tom Holland is bravely shrugging off Twitter threats this week following broadcast of his Channel 4 documentary Islam: the Untold Story.

What’s been even harder for him to take is the media’s inability to cope with it: religious illiteracy to coin a phrase.

Now Channel 4 have cancelled the screening party due to be held next week.

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Featured Publication

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